Why can some people eat whatever they want...and not put on weight?

Have you ever wondered how some people seem to be able to eat desserts after their meals, cakes every now and again, pizza whenever they want to.... and yet never seem to put on any weight?

Have you always thought it was just that you “have a slow metabolism” or because you “just have “bad” genes” that you struggle with your weight? ...

Have you always thought it was unfair that you only have to LOOK at something unhealthy and you seem to put on weight?...

Well there is one reason that some people may be able to get away with eating more calories, a wider range of foods, having a dessert every now and again ...without it having any negative effects on their bodies - and it relates to what is going on in their gut...

You might have heard of something called your MICROBIOME in a yoghurt advert. Well it is basically the range of micro-organisms that are in your gut (and there are in fact more micro-organisms in your gut than cells in your body). Many of these micro-organisms in our gut are beneficial to us - they help us to extract nutrients from our food and do many other things that are beneficial to our well-being. However there are other micro-organisms in our gut that can be harmful and that have been connected to a range of conditions including obesity (and even things like depression and anxiety, as we will see later).

So research suggests that the state of your micro-biome (how diverse it is and how many more good micro-organisms than bad ones you have) can have a huge impact on many aspects on your health - including on how you metabolise food. For example, studies have shown that transplanting the micro-biome of a lean mouse into an obese mouse, allows that obese mouse to return to a healthy weight. Studies also show that humans with a lot of a certain type of harmful bacteria in their gut are much more likely to be obese. Certain of these harmful bacteria have also been shown to increase the number of calories an individual extracts from food